Conference Theme

Our Cities, Our SDGs, Our Journey

AFHC 2018 THEME:
Our Cities, Our SDGs, Our Journey.
Our Cities …
We live in cities. Globally, more people live in urban areas than in rural settings. Currently, just over half of the world’s population is classified as living in urban areas, a proportion that is predicted to rise to 66% by the middle of this century – representing an additional 2.5 billion people. 
While cities offer many opportunities for employment and access to better services (health, education, social protection) that are necessary for good health and human development, cities can also pose unique health risks. For instance, when urbanization is unplanned or outpaces the capacity of local governments, inequities within cities can widen, with vulnerable communities emerging in the urban periphery.
Cities are arguably the best-known and largest of the settings approaches, which take a “whole system” approach to health and health equity. 
Cities are increasingly recognized as critical to achieving the SDGs, in part because of their growing share of the world’s population and also because  mayors and municipal governments have shown unprecedented leadership in addressing global development challenges. 
A healthy cities approach, which brings human development and health equity to the forefront, can complement more traditional efforts that prioritize economic and environmental sustainability. 
Our SDGs …
Adopted in September 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, replaced the Millennium Development Goals, which were in place for the past decade and a half. 
The SDGs, are a United Nations-sponsored global framework to coordinate efforts around ending poverty and hunger, combating inequality and disease, and building a just and stable world. 
They consist of a universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states have committed to use to frame both domestic and international development policies, for all communities in every country, with a deadline for attainment of 2030.
SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities is the only goal that is location-specific at a manageable scale. This is significant in that a city represents a microcosm of all the other goals. In this context, if we can get urban areas on the right path to sustainable development, we stand a good chance of positively influencing progress on virtually all the other goals.
Our Journey …
Countries started on the SDG journey in January 2016. This journey will require a new way of working, harnessing the considerable synergies across goals. The SDGs will not be achieved if not prioritized and uniquely planned for within the urban areas. Cities present many challenges, but the leadership and commitment that mayors have already shown to improve the lives of their residents in a sustainable and resilient way, offer a promising path forward.
Our Cities, Our SDGs, Our Journey
During this Conference we will be sharing our experiences—both good and bad—on this journey, as cities beome pioneers in the new SDG era. No one can do this alone. We need partnerships and collaboration as never before.
To reach our destination, we need the navigators and individuals who can turn goals and principles into concrete actions. The time to seize the opportunities and create the future we want is now – and the world depends on each of us to make it happen.
While all the SDGs are applicable to cities and urban areas, this conference will focus on six that are considered as especailly relevant to the cities. They are: SDG 2: Zero Hunger; SDG 6, Clean water and sanitation; SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities; SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production; SDG 13: Climate action; and SDG 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions.
During the Conference we will be looking for best practices and practical examples of how communities and cities are enacting the global agenda in their local initiatives.
Further readings:
More materials can be found at the following urls
http://citiscope.org/habitatIII/explainer/2015/03/what-are-sustainable-development-goals
http://faud.unc.edu.ar/files/Cities-SDG-Guide.pdf
http://unsdsn.org/news/2017/03/30/how-do-cities-localize-the-sdgs/
https://unu.edu/publications/articles/cities-heart-of-sdgs.html
http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/9gchp/healthy-cities-moving-forward/en/
http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/9gchp/healthy-cities-leadership/en/
http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/9gchp/healthy-cities/en/
http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/9gchp/healthy-cities-sdgs/en/

 

Our Cities …

We live in cities. Globally, more people live in urban areas than in rural settings. Currently, just over half of the world’s population is classified as living in urban areas, a proportion that is predicted to rise to 66% by the middle of this century – representing an additional 2.5 billion people. 

While cities offer many opportunities for employment and access to better services (health, education, social protection) that are necessary for good health and human development, cities can also pose unique health risks. For instance, when urbanization is unplanned or outpaces the capacity of local governments, inequities within cities can widen, with vulnerable communities emerging in the urban periphery.

Cities are arguably the best-known and largest of the settings approaches, which take a “whole system” approach to health and health equity. 

Cities are increasingly recognized as critical to achieving the SDGs, in part because of their growing share of the world’s population and also because  mayors and municipal governments have shown unprecedented leadership in addressing global development challenges. 

A healthy cities approach, which brings human development and health equity to the forefront, can complement more traditional efforts that prioritize economic and environmental sustainability. 


Our SDGs …

Adopted in September 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, replaced the Millennium Development Goals, which were in place for the past decade and a half. 

The SDGs, are a United Nations-sponsored global framework to coordinate efforts around ending poverty and hunger, combating inequality and disease, and building a just and stable world. 

They consist of a universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states have committed to use to frame both domestic and international development policies, for all communities in every country, with a deadline for attainment of 2030.

SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities is the only goal that is location-specific at a manageable scale. This is significant in that a city represents a microcosm of all the other goals. In this context, if we can get urban areas on the right path to sustainable development, we stand a good chance of positively influencing progress on virtually all the other goals.


Our Journey …

Countries started on the SDG journey in January 2016. This journey will require a new way of working, harnessing the considerable synergies across goals. The SDGs will not be achieved if not prioritized and uniquely planned for within the urban areas. Cities present many challenges, but the leadership and commitment that mayors have already shown to improve the lives of their residents in a sustainable and resilient way, offer a promising path forward.


Our Cities, Our SDGs, Our Journey

During this Conference we will be sharing our experiences—both good and bad—on this journey, as cities beome pioneers in the new SDG era. No one can do this alone. We need partnerships and collaboration as never before.

To reach our destination, we need the navigators and individuals who can turn goals and principles into concrete actions. The time to seize the opportunities and create the future we want is now – and the world depends on each of us to make it happen.

While all the SDGs are applicable to cities and urban areas, this conference will focus on six that are considered as especailly relevant to the cities. They are: SDG 2: Zero Hunger; SDG 6, Clean water and sanitation; SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities; SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production; SDG 13: Climate action; and SDG 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions.

During the Conference we will be looking for best practices and practical examples of how communities and cities are enacting the global agenda in their local initiatives.


Further readings:

More materials can be found at the following urls

What are sustainable development goals

Cities SDG Guide

How do cities localize the sdgs

Cities heart of sdgs

Healthy cities moving forward

Healthy cities leadership

Healthy cities

Healthy cities sdgs